New WhatsApp Features for iOS

Recently WhatsApp application was updated new features around the photos you made within. This update was only for iOS application.So now you have an opportunity to apply new filters to photos, videos and GIFs, and share them with your friends.

For now only five  options are available:

  • dubbed Pop
  • B&W
  • Cool
  • Chrome
  • Film.

However it’s not difficult to imagine more filters in the pipeline.

That should avoid the stream of photos that currently flood the chat whenever someone fires over a handful in row.

Finally, you can now swipe from left-to-right across an individual message in a thread to reply.

That should prove to be a bit of a time-saver – especially when compared to the previous method, which required users to press-and-hold on a message to load the menu with the option to Reply.

The new features are available on iOS now.

WhatsApp now lets users add filters to photos, videos and GIFs before sending them

WhatsApp now lets users add filters to photos, videos and GIFs before sending them. WhatsApp has yet to reveal an Android release date for the next update.

Also WhatsApp is going to launch another great feature ‘Unsend’ and ‘Revoke’, it lets users to recall all messages that have been sent within the last five minutes.

This includes text-based messages as well as those that include images, videos and GIFs.

Tapping and holding on the message summons a slew of new options, including Edit and Revoke

Sent files with quoted messages and attached documents will also be able to be recalled, as will Status replies.Unfortunately, there is a catch – only messages that have not yet been opened or read by the recipient can be recalled.

If the WhatsApp recipient reads the message or it falls outside that crucial five minute window, you’re going to have to deal with the fallout of whatever message you desperately tried to revoke.

WhatsApp recently pushed-out version 2.17.30 to the iOS App Store, however the Recall feature remains turned off.

Facebook: 100 Millions Euros Fine for Misleading Information

Recently Facebook was fined 110m euros (£95m) by the EU for providing “incorrect or misleading” information during its purchase of messaging service WhatsApp in 2014.

According to the European Commission said Facebook insist it could not automatically match Facebook user accounts and WhatsApp accounts.

But later a service that did just that was launched.

Facebook said the errors it had made were not intentional.

‘Clear signal’

“The Commission has found that, contrary to Facebook’s statements in the 2014 merger review process, the technical possibility of automatically matching Facebook and WhatsApp users’ identities already existed in 2014, and that Facebook staff were aware of such a possibility.”

However, it added that the fine would not reverse its decision to clear the $19bn purchase of WhatsApp and was unrelated to separate investigations into data protection issues.

“Today’s decision sends a clear signal to companies that they must comply with all aspects of EU merger rules, including the obligation to provide correct information. And it imposes a proportionate and deterrent fine on Facebook. The Commission must be able to take decisions about mergers’ effects on competition in full knowledge of accurate facts.”

Facebook said:

“We’ve acted in good faith since our very first interactions with the Commission and we’ve sought to provide accurate information at every turn.

“The errors we made in our 2014 filings were not intentional and the Commission has confirmed that they did not impact the outcome of the merger review. Today’s announcement brings this matter to a close.”

New WhatsApp Scam – Beware!

Reddit user u/yuexist reported a suspicious link  shared through WhatsApp among other social media platforms that tricks users into installing malware in their systems.

 Reddit user said that the link promises users to install WhatsApp in different colours. After user click the link, he is asked to share the site with his/her friends in order to get themselves verified. After that, the friends receive a message  “I love the new colours for WhatsApp,” along with the fake URL.

Most fake URLs, just like the one circulating on the social media platforms right now, consist of letters from the Cyrillic alphabet. This helps users to identify the malicious messages if observed carefully.

Please be careful and do you click any suspicious links.

WhatsApp Call in Qatar – How to Unblock?

As you probable know now WhatsApp in one of the most popular messenger in the world with amazing and useful features.
Just see google trend below.

However now WhatsApp calls are blocked in Qatar.
Is there any way to unblock WhatsApp calling in Qatar?
Yes! The answer is simple – use a VPN for Qatar!





VPN or virtual private network is safe and secure solution to avoid Internet limits in Qatar and others countries.

VPN is a special secured encrypted tunnel that masks your IP address and makes your Internet connection safe and private.
VPN can help to avoid any Internet restrictions.

3 Steps to Unblock WhatsApp calling in Qatar




    1. Receive your vpn account data
    2. Setup VPN connection

– this is fast and easy please review setup guides.

3. Enjoy WhatsApp without any restrictions.

 

Below you can find the list of reliable vpn providers for using in United Arab Emirates. All the services below offer free trial so you can test the solution before ordering.

Sahrzad VPN
 sahrzadlogo
1 week $3.99
1 month $9.99
3 months $27.99
6 months $53.99
1 year $89.99
 button.viewyouraccount




VPN Account
 kompany_logo
1 week $3.5
1 month $10
3 months $28
6 months $52
1 year $98
 button.viewyouraccount




 Spider VPN (for Android)The Cheapest!
1 week $3
1 month $5
3 months $10
6 months $15
1 year $29.99
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VPN Privacy
1 week $3.5
1 month $10
3 months $28
6 months $52
1 year $98
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Torrent VPNThe best for p2p
1 week $5
1 month $15
3 months $40
6 months $75
1 year $140
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Unblock WhatsApp Dubai 2017 Tested

Dubai is city of future. Fantastic building and new technologies, flying cards and metro trains without drivers. United Arab Emirates are amazing!

Millions of tourists visit Dubai every year. Even more people move to this place on business purposes. And all these people face the problem of Internet censorship in UAE.

Most VOIP services like Skype, Viber, WhatsApp, Line and others are blocked in Dubai and if you need these tools for communications with your family, friends or business partners you can use VPN.

Below you can see the list of web services blocked in Dubai:

  • Badoo
  • Viber
  • BBM voice
  • Whatsapp calling
  • VOIP calls
  • Skype
  • Facetime
  • Fring
  • Nimbuzz
  • Omegle
  • Oovoo





VPN or virtual private network is safe and secure solution to avoid Internet limits in Dubai.

Today Whatsapp is one of the most popular instant messenger in UAE. You can see this on the trend below.

 

Recent changes in Whatsapp makes it leader on the market.
If you are looking for reliable way to unblock Whatsapp calling – try VPN. This is special secure tunnel that masks your Internet connection and helps to bypass any Internet restrictions.

3 Simple Steps to Use WhatsApp calls in Dubai




  1. Receive your vpn account data
  2. Setup VPN connection
  3. Enjoy WhatsApp without any restrictions.

You can setup vpn connection in a few minutes following simple vpn setup guides.

Below you can find the list of reliable vpn providers for using in United Arab Emirates. All the services below offer free trial so you can test the solution before ordering.

Sahrzad VPN
 sahrzadlogo
1 week $3.99
1 month $9.99
3 months $27.99
6 months $53.99
1 year $89.99
 button.viewyouraccount

 



VPN Account
 kompany_logo
1 week $3.5
1 month $10
3 months $28
6 months $52
1 year $98
 button.viewyouraccount

 


 Spider VPN (for Android)The Cheapest!
1 week $3
1 month $5
3 months $10
6 months $15
1 year $29.99
 button.viewyouraccount

 


VPN Privacy
1 week $3.5
1 month $10
3 months $28
6 months $52
1 year $98
 button.viewyouraccount

 

Torrent VPNThe best for p2p
1 week $5
1 month $15
3 months $40
6 months $75
1 year $140
 button.viewyouraccount

Unblock WhatsApp Call UAE 2017 Tested

Whatsapp voice calling service is very convenient feature that is not available in United Arab Emirates and some others countries.
All VOIP services and applications are blocked in UAE and if you would like to unblock WhatsApp in UAE you can use a service like Sahrzad.

This is safe, secure and reliable solution which makes you anonymous and lets to avoid any Internet filter.

Your online privacy is under your control with such security solution.

You can unban WhatsApp with a few simple steps:

  1. Get Sahrzad service
  2. Setup secure tunnel on your device – this is simple
  3. Enjoy WhatsApp Calling wherever you are.

Read more on this topic:

How to Unblock WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Skype, Instagram, and others social services in Turkey

How to unblock WhatsApp in Dubai?

http://vpn-account.com/new/blog/how-to-unblock-whatsapp-in-uae/

 

 

VPN or Proxy? Are They Legal?

VPN and proxy have many similar but they are not the same. Let’s find out the difference between vpn and proxy.

What is a VPN?

VPN is a virtual private network. VPN lets you connect to the Internet via a vpn server run by a VPN provider. All the data you send, searches you make and websites you visit is transferred between your device and the “VPN server” and it is encrypted. In particular, a VPN creates an encrypted tunnel between two points over a network, one being the user and the other being the VPN server (the termination point). This network can include something as relatively small as a person or company’s private local area network (LAN), or the entire web.

A VPN is, essentially, a private network that uses a public network to connect remote sites or users, while encrypting all of a device’s internet traffic in the process, routing it through a middle-man server in a remote location, granting access to otherwise inaccessible network resources.

Why use VPN?

A VPN is predominantly used by the privacy-minded because it hides your internet activity from your internet service provider, as well as governments or spy agencies. In offices and schools, and even countries, which ban certain websites, VPNs can be used to navigate these restrictions.

A VPN can additionally be used to “trick” a website or service that you’re in a different country, known as “geo-spoofing.” For example, using a VPN to access the BBC iPlayer while abroad can trick the site to believe you’re still in the UK. Geo-spoofing will also let you see Netflix content not currently available in your region.

Elsewhere, a VPN can protect you from hackers when using a public Wi-Fi network and use peer-to-peer sites safely.

Why Use VPN for iPhone and iPad

What is Proxy?

While a VPN’s primary function is to protect the information being transported by creating a secure tunnel between the end user, or system, and the VPN server, a proxy routes internet traffic through another networked device, typically a remote server.READ NEXT

“When people talk about proxies, in most cases they are talking about web proxies allowing access to the internet, where they provide anonymity to the user as all traffic is seen to originate from the proxy,”

David Kennerley, director of threat research at security firm Webroot told WIRED.

Both proxies and VPNs are used to conceal the end user’s identity, in simple terms this is concealing the user’s external IP address, which is often used to spoof geo-location information. However, there’s a significant difference between the two. Paul Bischoff, Privacy Advocate at Comparitech.com explains:

“A VPN hides what you do online from your internet service provider, and hides who and where you are (your IP address) from the websites you visit and the apps you use. A proxy only does the latter and does not necessarily hide what you do from anyone.”

For example, if you’re in a coffee shop using the public Wi-Fi on a VPN, no-one in the coffee shop, or any other intermediaries, will be able to see the information being sent between your device and the VPN server. Even people with access to the local Wi-Fi hardware will not have visibility. Whereas, this typically isn’t the case when using a proxy.

In most cases, the websites you visit will not know your geo-location as the VPN is keeping your data safe in transport. Proxies are not designed to protect the data being transferred between the end user and the internet, instead anonymity for the user is the main purpose. Web proxies are used frequently to bypass geo-location restrictions on streaming media, for instance.

Are they safe to use?

Despite being controversial, VPNs and proxies will protect your identity and improve your security defences when using the internet. If you’re using public Wi-Fi frequently, VPN solutions are becoming a must for consumers. Why? Bischoff lists the reasons: “Censorship under autocratic regimes, particularly in the Middle East and Asia, is growing [and so] country-specific content licensing isn’t expected to go away anytime soon,” he explained. “Government surveillance powers are getting more advanced, and the US Senate just passed a bill that will allow American ISPs to sell customer’s web histories and other collected data without permission.”

The corporate world has been using VPN technologies for decades as the safest way to access the corporate network when working remotely, such as an office intranet with files only available to company employees. They were later commercialised as a means to bypass censorship, improve online privacy, and unblock geographically restricted content.

Are they legal?

The short answer is yes, but that doesn’t mean everyone is happy with them. Organisations which rely on spying on users, unsurprisingly, ban them where they can. Netflix disapproves of them, and is clamping down on users who ‘geo-spoof’ to access extra content.

Using WhatsApp? Think It Is Secure?

We live in era of Internet and social networks. Instant messengers are extremely popular today. And WhatsApp is one of the most desired and popular mobile messaging service. Now it has over 1 billion users every day. That is absolutely fantastic figure!

Many people want to be private, secure and safe in the Internet. If you want to be sure that your WhatsApp messages are not reviewed by third party you must take care about your security!

Facebook as a parent company of WhatsApp implemented encryption but not everyone trusts it.

If you want to be really secure – use a VPN – this is real encryption and privacy!

Now WhatsApp uses a part of Open Whisper Systems security protocol. It is quite good and reliable.

WhatsApp has taken a few hits and been in the news recently, and the somewhat limited understanding of encryption means it can be a bit confusing. Here are a few examples of WhatsApp in the news, and what it really means.

In January 2017 the Guardian reported claims that WhatsApp ‘has the ability to force the generation of new encryption keys for offline users, unbeknown to the sender and recipient of the messages, and to make the sender re-encrypt messages with new keys and send them again for any messages that have not been marked as delivered.’

The Guardian claimed that WhatsApp has a ‘backdoor’. If WhatsApp covertly changed security keys of a user, the company could, according to Tobias Boelter, a cryptography and security researcher at the University of California, ‘disclose its messaging records, it can effectively grant access due to the change in keys’ at the request of government agencies.

WhatsApp claims this loophole exists so that if someone changes their phone, and therefore their automatic security key, messages will still send so as not to disrupt service. This is, to be fair, a valid point, as not doing so would disrupt the service of 1 billion people relatively frequently.

Despite this, here is our guide on how to turn on WhatsApp encryption in the first place, and also how to opt out of adverts on the platform.

Wikileaks’ Vault 7

On Tuesday 7 March 2017 Wikileaks caused a stir by releasing ‘Vault 7‘, thousands of confidential documents it claims are from CIA internal networks. This has raised some concerns that WhatsApp messages, which are end to end encrypted, could be read.

Reporting can be slightly confusing in this instance; it’s not actually the encrypted nature of the messages that could be compromised. The reports detail the intelligence agencies’ ability to remote control single devices and access them as though they were the user. Obviously in this case, the encryption is still strong, but it is the end user’s device that has been compromised.

Therefore since this news, you needn’t worry about the validity of the encryption in WhatsApp, worrying though it is that Wikileaks is claiming the CIA and others have the power to hack individual devices.

So that’s the news side. Here’s the tech side.

WhatsApp encryption information

Chances are you’ve probably sent a fair few WhatsApp messages already today. As of 5 April, all those messages are now encrypted end-to-end – provided you have the most up to date version of the app downloaded on your iPhone, Android, Nokia, Window or BlackBerry smartphone handset. Here we break down what the somewhat confusing issue means for you – what is WhatsApp encryption?

How to turn on encryption in WhatsApp

WhatApps now securely encrypts every single message, call, picture, video or any other type of file you send so that the only person who can read or view it is the recipient. Not even WhatsApp has the ability to intercept and view those messages.

As a user, you don’t have to turn this feature on, nor can you turn it off. You should receive a message within your chats if you are using the latest version of the app (which is required) to let you know the change has been implemented for you.

What is encryption?

Encryption is the scrambling of messages from the sender on their journey to the recipient, largely to discourage the interception and reading of those messages by other parties.

This concept dates back thousands of years to coded written message sending, but now, modern forms of communication can be encrypted automatically with complex coding.

Thanks to the smartphone revolution, we now send and receive an awful lot more data between devices. All this data, be it voice calls, text messages or mobile data, is managed by whichever service provider whose service you are using. Whether or not this data is encrypted varies depending on the policy of the company providing the service.

For example, voice calls and text messages are handled by your mobile operator. This operator also provides your 3G or 4G connection to the Internet on your smartphone, but they don’t encrypt all the services you use.

If you tend to message via WhatsApp rather than text message, your mobile operator is not responsible for encrypting that WhatsApp data – it merely provides you with your connection to the wider Internet, the connection that allows apps such as WhatsApp, Facebook and Twitter to send messages all over the world.

How does WhatsApp end-to-end encryption work?

WhatsApp encrypting messages ‘end-to-end’ is a big deal because it means that the company itself has decided to run a system in which even it cannot intercept and read messages sent on its own platform.

When you send a message, it can only be ‘unlocked’ by the intended recipient, thanks to a very complex code that took WhatsApp several years to develop. It’s no mean feat to achieve, particularly given that 1 billion people use the service.

This differs to many messaging apps, which only encrypt messages between you and them. This means that your messages are stored on the services servers, usually not permanently, so hypothetically could be accessed and read.

Why has WhatsApp introduced end-to-end encryption?

Now that WhatsApp has end-to-end encryption, it means that they and no party – governments, police, hackers, other users – can intercept and read your messages.

WhatsApp has done this because as a company they believe in your right to have private conversations when you use their service.

Why is end-to-end encryption important?

The reason the decision is getting a lot of attention is because of high profile cases in which communications service providers like Facebook are put upon by authorities to release sensitive personal data.

A high profile case is the FBI asking Apple to unlock an iPhone 5C that was used by one of the San Bernardino shooters, a move which Apple refused, underlining the integral values many large communications companies hold when it comes to personal data, security and encryption.

Does every app have end-to-end encryption?

The short answer is no – but also this is not something to be alarmed about.

WhatsApp’s decision is one of the first of its kind, and is particularly interesting because traditionally smartphone messaging services have played down the importance of security.

Facebook Messenger only encrypts messages between your device and their servers. This means, by law, Facebook could be obliged to divulge private messages. The same applies to Instagram, which Facebook owns, though interestingly, it also owns WhatsApp.

 

Facebook bought WhatsApp in 2014 and the latter will now share users’ phone numbers with Facebook to provide advertisements. It’s a clear sign that the platform is having to monetise its offering after a few years of providing a free service.

It seems if you opt in, Facebook will recieve information in order to better target you with adverts on the Facebook platform. It’s a small but significant sign that the Facebook-owned WhatsApp is having to concede some of its privacy values.

If you don’t want to share additional information such as your phone number cross-platforms, here’s how to opt out of WhatsApp adverts.

You will be given the following screen where you can agree to the changes.

Instead of pressing agree, tap the arrow at the bottom of the screen to read more details. You’ll then get this screen, where you uncheck the box, opting out of sharing additional information:

If you’ve already clicked Agree, you can still reverse your decision for the next 30 days. Simply open WhatsApp and go into Settings > Account, then untick Share my account info.

Be Careful Using WhatsApp! Security Problem!

Several days ago some security problem with WhatsApp was announced.

The bug, which affected the web version of the messaging app, would have allowed people with technical knowledge to take over users’ accounts with a simple message. Clicking and opening a malicious file could have let hackers see victims’ conversations, photos, videos, contacts, shared files and more, security researchers at Check Point said.

WhatsApp has now fixed the problem, which could also have been used to take over accounts belonging to victims’ friends.

“Attackers could potentially download your photos and or post them online, send messages on your behalf, demand ransom and even take over your friends’ accounts,”

said the researchers.

The flaw was discovered in the end-to-end encryption WhatsApp uses. It is also used in encrypted messaging app Telegram, which has since fixed the problem as well.

Check Point alerted the companies about the issue last week. “Thankfully, WhatsApp and Telegram responded quickly and responsibly to deploy the mitigation against exploitation of this issue in all web clients,” said Oded Vanunu, from Check Point.

Vanunu added that they hadn’t seen anyone exploiting the problem in the course of their research.

WhatsApp said: “When Check Point reported the issue, we addressed it within a day and released an update of WhatsApp for web.”

To ensure their WhatsApp accounts are safe the company said users should restart their browsers, thereby making sure the version is up to date.

Top ten | The most secure messaging apps

1) Facebook WhatsApp – Facebook’s Messenger is less secure, however

 2) Apple iMessage and FaceTime

3) Telegram Messenger

4) Google Duo. The company’s Allo and Hangouts are less secure

5) Line

6) Viber

7) Kakao

8) Microsoft Skype

9) Snapchat

10) Blackberry Messenger

Tencent’s WeChat and QQ did not meet the privacy criteria of the test and were not ranked.

How to protect yourself

Although the problem has now been fixed on WhatsApp and Telegram, the researchers said users should take simple defensive steps to protect their information. Users are advised to periodically clear all logged-in computers form their WhatsApp and Telegram accounts in Settings.

Check Point added that users should always avoid opening suspicious files and links that come from numbers they don’t know.

1. Use a PIN or fingerprint security

Locking your screen will protect your sensitive data and apps from meddling

2. Use a longer passphrase

Go to your settings app, then “Touch ID & Passcode” and turn “Simple Passcode” off. This will allow you to create a longer and more complex passcode with upper and lowercase letters, numbers and other symbols

3. Activate self-destruct

You can tell your phone to delete all data if it thinks someone is trying to break in. Under the same page on Settings you can enable “erase data” – this will wipe the phone clean after ten incorrect guesses at the PIN

4. Increase your privacy settings

Go into your settings app and then the “privacy” tab. Here you will be able to see which apps have which privileges, and turn them off/on.

5. Turn off notifications

The ability to see a summary of notifications on the lock screen is handy, but if that gives away personal or confidential data then you could be in trouble. Remember, it will show the contents of messages you receive, your calendar for that day and various other things.

6. Disable Siri

Siri can leak data even when your phone is locked. Go to settings, then “Touch ID & passcode” and set “Allow access when locked” on Siri to Off.

7. Type it for yourself

AutoFill is a handy feature that does exactly what it says on the tin: any time that Safari sees a box asking for your name, username, password or credit card details, it fills them in for you. This is fine, unless someone else happens to be using your phone. To turn it off, go to settings, then general and “Passwords & AutoFill”.

8. Use VPN

VPN is a secured encrypted tunnel that makes you anonymous and keep all your data protected.

VPN is reliable solution and easy in use. You can try this solution today and be sure you are safe in the Internet.

Sahrzad VPN
 sahrzadlogo
1 week $3.99
1 month $9.99
3 months $27.99
6 months $53.99
1 year $89.99
 button.viewyouraccount

 

VPN Account
 kompany_logo
1 week $3.5
1 month $10
3 months $28
6 months $52
1 year $98
 button.viewyouraccount

 

 Spider VPN (for Android)The Cheapest!
1 week $3
1 month $5
3 months $10
6 months $15
1 year $29.99
 button.viewyouraccount

 

VPN Privacy
1 week $3.5
1 month $10
3 months $28
6 months $52
1 year $98
 button.viewyouraccount